Films directed by
Steven Soderbergh

Contagion

Blogging is not writing. It's just graffiti with punctuation.

If this were a better film, it could do for the sales of hand sanitizer what Sideways did for Pinot Noir.

This is not a bad film. It’s well-produced, well-acted by a first-rate cast, and diligently convincing in its scientific details. Unfortunately, it maintains an emotional distance between the audience and its characters, and this serves to keep the film from being truly engrossing.

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Ocean’s Thirteen

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2007 appears to have been the year of thirds, meaning the third entry in some highly visible film franchises. We had a third Shrek movie, a third Jason Bourne movie, a third Pirates of the Caribbean movie and a third Ocean’s Eleven movie. What does all of this mean? Absolutely nothing. It’s just a coincidence but I needed a way to open this review.

The real pleasure we get from watching movies like Ocean’s Thirteen has very little to do with storytelling, but derives from watching a lot of rich, good-looking people having a lot of fun doing things most of us just dream about. It’s fortunate that this is actually entertaining because there’s not a lot going on here in terms of story. Continue reading

The Good German

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Steven Soderbergh’s latest experiment is a clear triumph of style and technique over coherence and content. The Good German is admirable as a successful attempt to revive some lost techniques of filmmaking. Sadly, the less than clear storyline and shallow characters squander what could have been an intriguing exercise in resurrecting some of the great traditions of classic Hollywood. It’s still interesting to look at but after the stylistic novelty wears off, you’ll find yourself checking your watch regularly.

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Bubble

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Bubble, the first movie of Steven Soderbergh’s six picture deal with Mark Cuban’s HDNet, is a two-pronged experiment in both distribution and technique. On the business side, it’s the first film to have a deliberately orchestrated simultaneous release in theaters, on cable television and on DVD. Soderbergh and others believe that the DVD “window,” the period of time between a film’s theatrical release and its home video release, is inexorably shrinking to nothing. Others, especially some in the movie theater industry, think that this window is rather vital to their business model and that Soderbergh is full of it. This led more than a few theater chains to boycott this film because of its simultaneous DVD release.

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